Elastic makes $234m security play with Endgame buy

Elastic is stretching itself further into the security sector with the $234m acquisition of endpoint specialist Endgame Inc.

Elastic CEO Shay Banon wrote in a blog explaining the move, “We believe that by joining forces, we can bring to market a holistic security product that combines endpoint and SIEM, and is delivered using our unique go-to-market model.”

The companies are quite familiar with each other already. Endgame uses Elasticsearch as the “main datastore for its alerts and investigation workflows” Bannon continued.

For its part, Elastic has been looking to expand into the Security Information and Event Management market, and increasing the amount of data it harvests. “Endgame’s endpoint product would take that to a whole new level. It has built-in, enriched security data collection capabilities,” Banon wrote.

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Banon wrote that the Elastic Stack was already used for “threat hunting” by companies worldwide. “We believe that the ability to both bring another layer of data, as well as expanded threat hunting to the endpoint directly, is a unique value proposition of the combined products.”

Elastic had been developing agent technology in its Beats line, he said, and this would “fit nicely” with Endgame’s own agents. The target firm’s tech runs on platforms including Windows, Mac, Linux, and Solaris.

The firms had already been working on integrations, Banon wrote, as well as exploring exposing Elastic’s Kibana visualisation product on top of Endgame’s existing Elasticsearch deployments.

Once the deal is sealed, which is expected to take some months, this work should be pushed to fruition while more native integrations can be expected.

This isn’t Elastic’s first foray into the acquisition world. It bought Behavioural Analytics outfit Prelert back in 2016, and in 2017, bought SaaS site search firm Swiftype.

And the world of security – which is often not as exciting as you feel it should be – suddenly seems to be a target for up and coming companies with product ranges to fill out and money to spend.

Last week Palo Alto Networks snapped up Twistlock and Puresec on the same day. A week before that, GitHub bought Dependabot, a company offering automated dependency scanning and fixing.

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